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Re: Re: Does "Weight Shift" = Momentum


Posted by: Jack Mankin (MrBatspeed@aol.com) on Sat Dec 15 23:38:24 2007


>>> Jack,

Can we agree that every hitter shifts a portion of his total weight to his back foot before the bat is launched into its path?

No matter how little that portion of weight is, it is still shifted from not being there to being there.

Some hitters shift more weight to the back foot than others, but they ALL do shift some weight back before the bat is launched into its path.

The question I have for you is this. Why do you think they all do this?

If your answer is "Timing", than you must be more specific.

Thanks, <<<

Hi Jimmy

Anytime a batter lifts his front foot to take a stride, his total weight must be supported by his back leg. However, I do not agree with the concept that batters must "go back, so they can go forward." To me, that is not how high level batters "load" for the swing. The reason the batter has more weight on the back leg in the launch position is not because he needs go forward. It is because his axis of rotation is tilted rearward 10 to 15 degrees to match the plane of the incoming pitch.

To me, "loading" means that as the batter prepares his launch position, he stretches the muscles required to induce a strong hip and shoulder rotation. I refer to this as the "inward turn" of the shoulders, which provides 20 to 30 degrees of separation between hips and shoulders at initiation. The inward turn also brings the lead-arm and hands to the correct position where shoulder rotation can rotate them into a CHP. I refer to this part of the inward turn as "hiding the hands" from the pitcher.

Therefore, I do not believe in the concept that the hands go straight back so they can go forward. -- I don't know if this answers your question -- it is what I teach.

Jack Mankin


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