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Re: Re: Hitting off a tee


Posted by: grc () on Sun Aug 7 08:10:06 2005


> Larry,
>
>
> A tee is one of, if not the, most important tool in my training regimen. (the following examples are for high school players).
> Not just any tee, but (if I am allowed to plug [and I don’t get a kickback])
>
> http://www.tannertees.com/
>
> and buy yourself a throwdown home plate. Store bought home plates are about ¾ inch thick. I made my own (using official dimensions) because I wanted the plate to be flat (level with the ground), so that I could place the tee on the outside corner without the base being tilted.
>
>
> Why is the tee so important, to me?
>
> In one session I can see, more clearly than viewing video , what the most crucial problems a specific hitter has, and point them out to the hitter, better than video, AND because the hitter can physically feel it. Conversely, I can see a hitter that doesn’t need anybody’s help.
>
> How? Space (and my typing speed) doesn’t permit me to outline all, but I will touch on some points.
>
> 1. throw home plate down and tell the hitter to take his position in the box, relative to the plate. Note where he positions his feet (don’t worry about any other body parts).
>
> 2. tell him to take his “normal” stride (if he has one) and freeze at “toe touch” (toe touch is to be treated separately from “heel plant”). This is what I consider “launch position” (actually it is fractional milleseconds later in a fluid swing, but this is close enough). This is one of the most crucial points in a swing, and you (as a coach) should observe every body part at this point. I usually have a batter do this at least six times, while I observe (boring after six). If the batter’s launch position isn’t optimum, then correction is in line. I think enough has been written about launch here at this site)
>
> 3. I then ask the hitter what height his favorite “rip zone’ pitch is. I set the tee accordingly.
>
> 4. The first place I set the tee (with the hitter in launch position) is even with his front toe and center line of plate. Have him hit. This is, in effect hitting no stride.
> Then place even with front toe but splitting the inside edge of plate.
> Then even with front toe but splitting the outside edge of plate.
> Then 12 inches in front of front toe (towards pitcher) and inside, center, and outside of plate.
> Then 12 inches behind the front toe and inside, center, and outside.
>
>
> What I have found is that most hitters (that aren’t what you call good hitters) assume a position too close to the plate (some toes 6” from the edge of the plate). And when you place the tee/ball on the inside corner (even if you place it as much as eighteen inches in front of the stride toe position) they are jammed. Usually this hitter is the one seen “stepping out” on every pitch. What has developed from fear of the ball (stepping toward 3rd base for a righty to get away from a pitched ball), is a necessity for getting around (enough room) to hit a pitch that is jamming him inside, all because he is standing too close to the plate. Watch a major league game and the center field shot over the pitcher’s shoulder will reveal the plate and the batters feet. Most batter’s assume a position where the front toes are as far away from the edge of home plate as is the width of home plate (and that is 17 inches). They cover the entire plate from this stance. I point this out to batters and show them how tilting the torso and waiting for the ball to get further in on them, can provide adequate coverage for outside pitches. This can be demonstrated by having them stand off the plate (toes 17 inches from the edge) and placing the tee 12 inches behind the stride foot front toe position (at launch) on the outside edge of the plate, and having them hit it.
> If you move them off the plate, and they translate this to game conditions, they no longer see a curve as coming to hit them. They gain confidence and eventually they realize that they must stride toward the pitcher (not toward 3rd for a righty), in order to cover the entire plate.
>
> Another demonstration with the tee:
> Have the batter stand with toes 17 inches off the inside edge of the plate. Have them stride to launch. Place the tee on the outside corner 12 inches under 3 different conditions (in front of the stride foot toes, even with the toes, and 12 behind the toes) telling them to try and pull that outside pitch under each condition. Then have them try and hit the same positions of the tee ball to the opposite field. This will let them MENTALLY KNOW and PHYSICALLY FEEL what is right for their bodies to do.
>
> Actually an excellent drill which I learned at:
>
> http://www.youthbaseballcoaching.com/inside_outside.html
>
> (with some adjusting of tees) and is part of how I train hitters with a tee.
>
> I also do one hand (lead arm only) while watching proper position of the lead elbow (to the path of the simulated pitch). I also switch up and have them use as heavy a bat as they can use without hurting themselves while keeping their lead hand down at the knob. They will learn to use other body parts to help bring the bat.
>
>
> There are many more drills with the tee, but remember that this should be individual instruction. Observers become bored easily.
>
> Note:
> The reason I use Tanner tees is because they can be placed off the plate for contact points for pulling inside pitches. Many professional teams use them. George Brett used them.
>
>
>ray, you did a fine job of pointing out the advantages of using a tee...i hope the distinguished Black Hole Lexciographer will see your post...if BHL were to use the tee to do the experiments i have suggested in the past, he (BHL) would undoubtably retract his arguments in favor of "PFO" ....
>
>
>
>
> .


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