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Re: Re: pure rotational hitting


Posted by: tom.guerry (tom.guerry@kp.org) on Thu Feb 16 11:01:12 2006


> Hi Guru
>
> Before we can have a productive discussion of linear or rotational mechanics, we must first have a clear definition of the terms. – This site has always maintained that there is linear movement of the body during the stride. However, that linear movement occurs ‘prior’ to the actual swing being initiated. Prior to the initiation of the swing, linear movement ceases and the body rotates about a stationary axis. – There is no linear movement of the body once the swing is initiated.
>
> Therefore, the length of a batter’s stride (or lack of stride) or the amount of weight shifted prior to the swing has no bearing on whether his transfer mechanics are linear or rotational. Below is a post that explains how this site has defined “linear” and “rotational” from its conception in 1999.
>
> Jack Mankin
> ##
>
>
> Re: Re: Linear vs rotational?
>
> Posted by: Jack Mankin (MrBatspeed@aol.com) on Wed Mar 5 22:49:26 2003
>
>
> >>> After 37 years in this game, I have still never figured out what a LINEAR hitter is or who teaches it. I see posts every week about linear vs rotational, but no one has ever given me an explanation or pointed out a book that teaches linear hitting. Who teaches it and what is it. I know what it says in the dictionary. Does any one know? <<<
>
> Hi Doug
>
> If you have not been a long time visitor to Batspeed.com, it is understandable that you may not be familiar with the Linear vs Rotational controversy. We may not have coined the terms, as 55 speculated, but we were at the forefront in pointing out the difference in the two terms. Therefore, I will try to give a short, clear definition of the two mechanics.
>
> Linear mechanics has been taught by most (probably 98%) of the batting instructors for decades. “Linear” refers to mechanics that promote an inline (A to B) thrust of the hands straight back at the pitcher. It may be referred to as “quick hands”, “knob to the ball” or similar batting cues where the muscles in the arms are mainly used to accelerate the hands away from the back-shoulder toward the pitcher.
>
> With Rotational mechanics, the muscles in the arms are not used to accelerate the hands. The hands stay back at the shoulder and are swung (or flung) into a circular path by the rotation of the body. --- The bottom line --- Linear mechanics produce a straighter hand-path – Whereas, Rotational mechanics produce a more circular hand-path.
>
> Why does rotational transfer mechanics out perform linear mechanics? – Because there is a “pendulum” effect that accelerates the bat-head when the hands are taken in a circular path. There is no “whip” or “pendulum” effect that occurs from a straight extension of the hands.
>
> Note: Regardless of the length of stride, all good hitters rotate around a stationary axis. Therefore, length of the stride or amount of weight shift has little bearing on whether or not a batter is Linear or Rotational.
>
> Jack Mankin

One way to think of this is that the up/down swing plane adjustment can be made by torso tilt much as described by Epstein.Getting the axis upright generally requires MORE forward weight shift before the axis is set.The swing works better as in golf if the weight/center of mass does not fall back before contact so in general, you do not start forward then lean the axis back, you start to tilt upright, but if low ball is recognized, the shift stops sooner.


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