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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Pulling All Pitches


Posted by: The Hitting Guru (hitman3527@aol.com) on Sat Mar 11 16:59:55 2006


> > > > > > Hi All:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > If we consider the empirical, geometrical, and, to a certain extent physical ramifications of pulling all pitches, one can easily debate critics that claim its absurdity. To paraphrase Jack, hypothetical model that challenges conventional baseball wisdom is likely to arouse one's ire. The folly here is, though, the same individual(s) who make this claim often fall into the camp they so desparately criticize.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Let's take my model from just the untrained eyes of the observer. Many members of the 500 home run club had a propensity to pulling every pitch: Mickey Mantle, Harmon Killebrew, Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmiero, and others.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The observer must then ask this question: why is pulling every pitch beneficial. The answer simply is that the natural field is has one of the shortest proximal dimensions on in the ballpark.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > This will segway into another question: if the opposite field is the same distance than the natural field, then why not hit to that area. The answer is that balls are hit with more force when pulled then pushed the other way. I believe thar even Adair and Jack support this notion.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Here is the BHL challenge: individuals should chart the top power hitters, and estimate what percent is hit to the opposite field. Overall, how many of these hitters pull all pitches? Who out there is willing to accept?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Sincerely,
> > > > > > BHL
> > > > > > Knight1285@aol.com
> > > > > >
> > > > > > P.S. I welcome all criticism, and will give individuals a week to comment before I respond. Please remember, in order to learn from this discussion, I would appreciate that all feedback, negative especially, be backed with reasons why individuals feel that way. Let the debates begin!
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > BHL. I like your challenge as it promotes discussion and incite. In today's game the best hitters are our homerun hitters. My best power hitters for the most part would be to name some: A-Rod, David Oriz, Manny Ramirez, Todd Helton, Paul Konerko, Derek Bell, Pujols, Bonds, Sheffield, Haffner.
> > > > >
> > > > > Of the above, the pull hitters would be Konerko, Haffner, Sheffield, Bonds, and Ortiz. Likely for these players the shift would be on or would at least make sense to use.
> > > > >
> > > > > The reason why some of these hitters hit homeruns to the opposite field is that they look to go that way. And they can on occassion jam themselves and fight the ball to a homerun in the case of Ramirez, Ortiz, and A Rod. Pitchers do not have the guts/stuff for the most part to challenge them inside.
> > > > >
> > > > > The players I mentioned are bonified .300 hitters who are good enough to get hits in all directions. This is not to say that they could not be dead pull hitters and even hit more homeruns. If they were dead pull hitters they would strike out from 150 to 200 times because they would not get enough decent pitches to swing at. Bonds is the only exception to this rule. And since he has been considered guilty of doping, it is likely he would strike out more as well.
> > > > >
> > > > > Brian Roberts who was a leader in homeruns early last year would be an example of a pull hitter who hit almost all his homeruns to the power field. But like Don Mattingly (my favorite hitter), he is unique in being able to hit for a high average and still pull before he like Roberts got injured.
> > > > >
> > > > > With regard to earlier comments by BHL, more homeruns in general would be hit the opposite way if players closed their stances more and mad a deliberate attempt to hit in that direction. Also the additional time to wait for the pitch would allow more time for solid contact. Also, the advent of the increased intentional walk (as a cop out) has contributed to less pull hitters who are successful average wise. Reggie Jackson stated that Barry Bonds would have hit 100 homeruns the year he hit 73 had he been pitched to.
> > > > ==========
> > > > The hitters your talking about being pull hitters. Are they just pulling the ball or they the best and hitting a pitchers mistake. You can watch College or even HS players. You see pitches get in to the red zone and players foul it off or pop it up. the batter knows the he missed a good pitch. Is it that the better hitters take advanage of a pitchers mistake.
> > > > And to be fair, you would have to chart the pitch location to be considered if the ball was pulled. To me to pull a ball would have to be on the outside half. Bonds crowds the plate more them most hitters and his bat is monster. I guess the juice helps with that also.
> > > >
> > > > just my 2cents!
> > > > Mike
> > >
> > > Attempting to drive in runs vs attempting to hit a HR's are two separate entities that do not always exist at the same time in a real game situation. Runner at 3rd with two outs tie ball game, bottom of the ninth...a good hitter will (should) attempt to drive the runner in...while attempting to drive the runner in the hitter must be able to drive the baseball where its pitched, is their guessing that goes along with this, you bet, thatís a separate topic however...the team win/goal must take president over the individual glory of hitting a homerun in that situation. Is their a time for a legitimate homerun hitter to try and end the game with one swing of the bat, sure...is that feet one of the hardest single skills to do in all of sports, YES!
> > >
> > > In short, pulling all pitches, all the time is OMO selfish and will lead to more roll over ground balls to the pull side corner infielders more times then homeruns will occur. It is a bad rule of thumb that will not win games.
> >
> >
> > S.Winton. You have sumed up Charlie Lau Sr's. beliefs in a nutshell. It is exactly that thinking that prompted Charlie Lau's studies. Lau introduced that their is a backward shift of the weight and a forward shift of the weight. Ted Williams also said basically the same thing but in a different way. Both instructors believed that in order to hit, certain things should be constant. Ted Williams believed that hitters who were not strong type hitters should not be hitting a lot of fly balls especially to the opposite field. True enough it is possible for hitters of equal strength to hit balls vastly different for distance. But on average the speed guys and the middle infielders are not your typical power hitters. And for the most part their long hit is not going out of the park. Brett Boone was a good example. He had one great year and fizzled out. Most likely because he became too concerned with the homerun. There are always exceptions to the rule, but for the most part the game has not changed too much. The White Sox of last year are living proof that execution and pitching win the most ball games.
>
> Hi Hitting Guru and S. winton,
>
> One of the geometric advantages of pulling all pitches is that it allows single hitters to turn into home run hitters. For the sake of argument, suppose an individual is 5'7," 139 lbs., and can only clear the pull field fence. This will mean that if he he hits 30 potential home runs, but 25 are hit to other fields, this player will only have attain 5 home runs. If the player gets 300 AB, his home run frequency will be 1 home run per every 60 AB.
>
> On the other hand, if the player pulls all these pitches, he could possibly wind up with 30 home runs. Given the same number of ABs, this amounts to 1 home run every 10 AB! It also helps the team in the area of runs, runs batted in, and perhaps intentional walks.
>
> When the last scenario arises, the speedy pull field orientee will be on the base paths, and in position to steal his way into scoring position (perhaps even steal a run).
>
> Just some material to consider, S. Winston. I appreciate your prompt feedback, though I do find some salvic hope in using my system to turn singles hitters into home run hitters via dimensional strategy.
>
> As for the Hitting Guru, I believe that closing the stance will allow one to hitting to the opposite field with more velocity, but it will also allow the hitter to pull the ball with much more velocity.
>
> I am open to further discussion.
>
> Best Wishes,
> BHL
> Knight1285@aol.com
>
> P.S. Slo-pitch softball has helped me appreciate these aspects of the game. If a softball can be hit 340+ to the natural field with difficulty consistently, then a player should have no problem to hitting to the natural field with consistency with consistency.


BHL. I appreciate your analysis and agree. And a prime example would be a left hand hitter who plays for the New York Yankees. There is a significant amount of room to pull the ball there without hitting the ball great distances (314 to 353 ft.) But it is interesting how few players maximize that opportunity. Brian Roberts was doing so the beginning of last year in Baltimore which also has a favorable hitting area to the pull field. But the key is to hit the pitches a player can handle and lay off the ones one cannot. The hitter has to have a good eye as well as concept. And as your report alludes, it is not necessary to hit pull the ball down the line, but just to pull it. Lou Pinella made a tape about making the best use of the power that you have. I am still waiting for my copy, but it is back dated.


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This is known as hitting for the cycle in a game?
   Single, double, triple, homerun
   Four singles
   Three homeruns
   Three stikeouts

   
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