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Re: Re: Re: Re: The Swing-Level, slight upper-cut?


Posted by: Joe LoRusso (josephlorusso@hotmail.com) on Thu Dec 18 09:31:01 2008


> > > Hi Dog
> > >
> > > I put my thoughts down on this subject in "Swing down at the Ball" under "Truisms or Fallacies." Let me know what you think.
> > >
> > > Jack Mankin
Hello All:

Let me start out by saying that Steve Ferrolli is a fine example on how to teach a skill. The skill we are talking about is hitting a baseball.

Bat Speed is important in hitting for power. If you do not generate enough bat speed you will not be able to hit the ball out of the park.

Take for example David Ortiz he generates enough bat speed to hit the ball far and not all ballplayers can achieve this feat. He is a marvel at what he does.

Joe LoRusso


> > Hello Jack and BHL: I read both of your thoughts and I agree. I believe Williams is correct with proper terminology such as "upswing" instead of uppercut. This slight upswing does allow the bat to stay in the contact area longer. Obviously, the hands start down, but they certainly should not stay moving downward or you are just chopping wood. Thanks for the insights..dog
> > Salutations Jack and Dog,
> > While the uppercut--or upswing, to be precise--is longer than the level swing, or downswing, it "keeps the barrel of the bat in the potential contact zone for the longest period of time." This information can be found in "Hitting The Ted Williams Way, Vol. 1" (Steve Ferroli), Hit Your Potential (Steve Ferroli), and in The Science of Hitting (Ted Williams).
> >
> > I do not agree with a majority of the material I read, but Ferroli and Williams made a lucid point that "uppercutting" is incorrect, because you are denoting a golf-swing trajectory, whereas an "upswing" denotes giving the level swing an upward diagonal trajectory, discussed in The Science of Hitting (Ted Williams), and Hit Your Potential (Steve Ferroli). In the latter book, I believe Ferroli states 'he understands why Mo Vaughn uppercuts, but believes a slight upswing will be more effective.'
> >
> > If you have any more thoughts, speak, I charge you, with resilience of mind and hand, and let the juice of your thoughts squirt through the com wires and spill out unto thy webpage. This is my Poetically-Based Statistical Lexicography.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > The Black Hole Lexicographer
> > Knight1285@aol.com


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