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Re: Re: Re: Bat speed vs mass


Posted by: LarryB (lbieber@q.com) on Fri Apr 23 11:22:17 2010


> > > Great Post and answers...just found this site and it is very
> intriguing......but in regards to the information in regards to bat
> mass vs speed......am i correct in saying that a 30 oz bat swung at 68
> mph will cause the ball to travel further than a 28oz bat swung at 68
> mph? Of course all other things being equal?
> > >
> > > If this is the case than do you know what the trade off would be
> in using a heavier bat vs the bat speed lost by doing so? For
> example...if you could swing a 33 0z bat at 65 mph or a 30 oz bat at
> 68 mph, which would be the more desirable option....all else being
> equal?
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > Dave
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > >
> > > > Also another thing to take into consideration is the size of the
> bat. But overall, it is more important to generate bat speed than it
> is to get bat mass. A ball will travel farther when a heavier bat is
> used if a hitter was able to use a heavy bat plus swing with the same
> velocity of a light bat while hitting in the center of percussion.
> The problem for most mortals is that they cannot swing a heavier bat
> as fast. I don't know anyone that can swing a 42 ounce bat as fast
> as a 33 ounce bat, including Barry Bonds.
> > > >
> > > > There is so much more. But I hope this answered some of your
> questions.
> > > >
> > > > My Best,
> > > >
> > > > Joe Hernandez
> >
> > I'm thinking that the ball doesn't care.
> >
> > Does the ball know the weight of the bat?
> > Or does the ball react to the density of material, and the speed, or
> angular velocity, with which the bat impacts it?
> >
> > More hitter strength is required to accelerate a heavier vs. lighter
> bat to a given speed.
> >
> > It would be interesting to see a study on ball response physics to
> impact variables.
> > Maybe Jack can help with this.
> >
> > Jim D
>
> Guys,
>
> I'm guessing that, in general, the bat you are most comfortable with
> will be the one to best suit you. It's one of the oldest equations in
> physics: Force = Mass * Acceleration. In other words, the greater the
> mass of the bat, the more force it can impart to the ball. But at the
> same time, a hitter cannot give a heavier bat the same amount of
> acceleration as he can a lighter bat. Certainly, this doesn't happen
> in a vacuum and other factors apply, such as the distribution of
> weight of the bat itself, amount of spin imparted to the ball
> (lessening the overall linear force imparted to it), etc. There
> probably IS a minor advantage one way or the other, but I'd advise the
> hitter to find the bat that he can swing WELL and consistently contact
> the ball at the sweet spot with. Work on the mechanics with THAT bat,
> because if you try and tweak every little thing, every time, it will
> be harder to develop the consistency.
>
> Bryce

Here is a physics based explanation for those that have not seen it:

http://paws.kettering.edu/~drussell/bats-new/batw8.html


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