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Re: Re: Re: Re: Debunking Linear Cues - cont


Posted by: Jack Mankin (MrBatspeed@aol.com) on Tue Jan 2 13:01:29 2007


>>> Jack,
I think that describing the swing as having only one fixed axis is misleading. There are multiple axis in a quality swing. One being the back foot, another being the hips and torso, and another being the hands or wrists. The hands are not a fixed axis and thay must initially start on a more linear path and gradually the rotational portion of the hands takes place through the point of contact . If you watch the hands they are in motion moving forward once the linear movement of the stride ceases. The hitter then begins to gradually apply more force to the bat out in front through the point of contact causing crazy bat-speed through the ball rather than way before contact is made (making the swing more productive).

Similarly to you, I do not like the term "knob or hands to the ball"
because you don't actually make contact with your hands or the knob. This term can also lead to a weak position of the top hand on the bat. This term is meant to remind the hitter that the hands and legs together start the initial approach towards the general direction the ball is coming from. The term "knob to the ball" if taken to literaly, as some do, can be confusing. That is why I don't use that term.

As far it being possible to have too much rotation in a swing, absolutely. If the shoulders and hips start to rotate around thier axis too violently or too soon before the hands and legs start, the very important barrel of the bat is left behind and the axis of rotation of the hands will happen too soon causing the bat to shoot out away from thier body towards the opposite dugout and travel slowly through the actual hitting zone. I guess this is where the terms "casting" and "trying to have some bat lag" came about. You can also have too much rotation at the end of the swing, meaning the hitter did not stay "on the ball" and rotated off too soon and too far.

Thank you for responding, and please continue the discussion. Jimmy <<<

Hi Jimmy

You stated; “The hands are not a fixed axis and thay must initially start on a more linear path and gradually the rotational portion of the hands takes place through the point of contact . If you watch the hands they are in motion moving forward once the linear movement of the stride ceases. The hitter then begins to gradually apply more force to the bat out in front through the point of contact causing crazy bat-speed through the ball rather than way before contact is made (making the swing more productive).

Jimmy, your statement exemplifies the difference between linear and rotational transfer mechanics. The forces applied to the bat during initiation produce trajectories that will set the tone for the entire swing. In order to induce the greatest amount of angular acceleration into the bat, the first directional movement of the hands must be arcing “perpendicular” (or as close as possible to it) to the line of flight of the ball. There is no way a batter can attain maximum bat speed in the contact zone if the first movement of his hands is linear (directed at the pitcher).

Over-head views of the best hitters show that they all have the first movement of their hands directed more perpendicular to, rather than inline with, the flight of the incoming ball. Although this clip of Pete Rose ( http://www.youthbaseballcoaching.com/mpg/Rose.mpeg ) is not the best example, a frame-by-frame advancement reveals the first directional movement of his hands is not directed linear (inline with the incoming ball).

Jack Mankin


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