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Re: Re: Jack, another question


Posted by: Jack Mankin (MrBatspeed@aol.com) on Sun Dec 9 10:37:53 2001


>>> I have a 2 part question about how long it takes to make a swing. #1 How long does it take to make a full swing. #2 How long from the start of the swing to contact. I know there is no hard and fast number for all hitters. I am interested in an average or some representative number.
>
> I read the Batspeed reasearch section and it said
>
> "The large muscles in his legs and back have rotated his hips and shoulders to a point where the belly button and chest are now facing the pitcher. His lead shoulder is now starting to rotate back in the direction of the catcher. This means that the lead arm, and thus the bottom hand, are now being pulling back toward the catcher as the bat approaches contact. --- At the same time the rear shoulder (and top hand) are rotating around toward the pitcher."
>
> How can the belly button and the chest be facing the pitcher and the lead shoulder "is now starting to rotate back in the direction of the catcher" Does this mean that the lead shoulder has moved toward the pitcher then around the body and is moving back towar the catcher, Past that point of being square to the pitcher? Did I missunderstand something?
>
> Also, if the shoulders have turned past being square to the pitcher and the bat has not made contact, it seems that the torque of the body has been used up and the power is gone. My naked eye tells me that the shoulders are turned toward the second baseman, about, at contact?

Sorry, but after reading that section again I have another question.

It says that
"The large muscles in his legs and back have rotated his hips and shoulders to a point where the belly button and chest are now facing the pitcher. His lead shoulder is now starting to rotate back in the direction of the catcher. This means that the lead arm, and thus the bottom hand, are now being pulling back toward the catcher as the bat approaches contact. --- At the same time the rear shoulder (and top hand) are rotating around toward the pitcher.

I am assuming that this is written in order that it happens. If so, the front shoulder is past the point of being square to the pitcher and is moving back towar the catcher, then how would the back shoulder start moving away from the catcher? Don't the two shoulders move together? I keep trying to get into the position as it is described and it seem to me that it can't be done. No matter what I do, the plane of my are always facing the same way. What am I missing? <<<

Hi Louis

Welcome to the site. The answer to your questions, “#1 How long does it take to make a full swing. #2 How long from the start of the swing to contact” depends on what constitutes a “full swing.” Normally I do not include the time taken during the stride or after contact has been made. The measurements could vary greatly (10 to 20+ video frames) if we include those periods. Most swing time measurements are taken from when body rotation starts (or the acceleration of the hands) and ends at contact.

Video runs at 30 frames per second. The better hitters swing requires from 4 to 5 frames from initiation to contact (4/30 to 5/30 sec). Some of the swings I see while doing video reviews run as high as 9 frames.

Louis, to understand the mechanics I am describing in the paragraph below, you must remember that linear movement of the stride (forward weight-shift) and body rotation should not take place at the same time. Before rotation starts, all forward movement, or weight-shift, comes to a stop. Then the body rotates around a stationary axis. The lead-shoulder will start rotating toward third-base (right handed batter) and the back-shoulder toward first-base.

"The large muscles in his legs and back have rotated his hips and shoulders to a point where the belly button and chest are now facing the pitcher. His lead shoulder is now starting to rotate back in the direction of the catcher. This means that the lead arm, and thus the bottom hand, are now being pulling back toward the catcher as the bat approaches contact. --- At the same time the rear shoulder (and top hand) are rotating around toward the pitcher."

Jack Mankin


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