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Re: Swing Types


Posted by: T Olson (timolson@home.net) on Fri Jan 14 14:18:19 2000


The ""inside out"" approach

I wonder sometimes if everyone's idea of the inside-out swing is the same thing.

In golf, the inside-out path connotates that the club head starts on an inside path and as it goes through the contact area it's traveling on a path that will take it outside after contact is made.

Isn't the theory that this type of action delivers a slight crossing blow that imparts a spin on the ball that will cause it to draw?

Whereas an outside-in path will cause the fade.

Most golfers want to work with a predictable fade or draw rather than try to hit the ball dead solid square where there is less tolerance for mishit and less predictability.

However, the intent in baseball is not the same (not to deliver spin) although a slight undercut may provide backspin and therefore "lift".

So, the question is: what does it mean? Should the term really be just a plain "inside-swing" with extension really only coming into play in relationship to where the ball needs to be hit.

I think the better term is "staying inside the ball". Most people regardless of their bias toward rotational (like me) or weight shift seem to believe this is a good thing. Jack--on this site believes (as I do) that a tight circular hand-path (that stays fairly close to and rotates with the body is the optimum for bat-speed. Others believe in a straight "knob to the ball" path. However, very few if any seem to advocate casting the hands (and bat barrel) early in the swing.

In general, the inside pitch may be the only time the barrel should "beat the hands to the ball". However, early in the swing--I believe the same action should occur regardless--it's only later that the difference in ways to attack inside, outside, or middle pitches comes into play.

So bottom-line, are there any theories out there that don't prescribe starting on an inside path? Does anyone know of a pro that could be classified as not having an inside swing?

If not, I don't see inside-out as major difference to be classified as swing-types. Or am I missing something? However, the degree to which a batter "stays inside" varies.

I see not having an inside swing as something that should be fixed regardless of the type of mechanics being used. Does anyone have a different opinion on that?


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