[ About ]
[ Batspeed Research ]
[ Swing Mechanics ]
[ Truisms and Fallacies ]
[ Discussion Board ]
[ Video ]
[ Other Resources ]
[ Contact Us ]
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Mickey Mantle


Posted by: Jack Mankin (MrBatspeed@aol.com) on Wed Jul 25 13:33:00 2007


>>> Listen to me: Mickey Mantle was a natural power hitter. He played at a time when center field distances of 430' were the norm. Today's players are juiced up freaks. Short fences, a live ball, average pitchers, too many ball clubs. Did you notice that todays players usually swing with one hand. They let go of the bat at the end of their swing and still hit the ball over 400'!!!! Steriods anyone. <<<

Hi Mike

Welcome to the site. – I think we can all agree that Mickey was one of the best power hitters of all time and that Steriods have placed a dark cloud over today’s batting stats. But that does not change the fact that it takes more than strength to be a great hitter. Although Mickey had great natural strength, he, like all great hitters, also exhibited very efficient swing mechanics for transferring strength into bat speed. – Granted, steriods played a role in Bonds’ and McGwires’ records. But also keep in mind that they were great hitters before steriods.

Mike, you state, “Did you notice that todays players usually swing with one hand. They let go of the bat at the end of their swing and still hit the ball over 400'!!!! Steriods anyone.” -- That is misleading assessment. None of today’s hitters “swing with one hand.” From initiation through contact they all have both hands on the bat. The top-hand does not let go of the bat until after contact and the ball is well on its’ way. Therefore, after contact, whether a batter keeps both hands on the bat or not, has no influence on the ball’s flight.

Jack Mankin


Followups:

Post a followup:
Name:
E-mail:
Subject:
Text:

Anti-Spambot Question:
This is known as hitting for the cycle in a game?
   Single, double, triple, homerun
   Four singles
   Three homeruns
   Three stikeouts

   
[   SiteMap   ]