[ About ]
[ Batspeed Research ]
[ Swing Mechanics ]
[ Truisms and Fallacies ]
[ Discussion Board ]
[ Video ]
[ Other Resources ]
[ Contact Us ]
Re: Re: Re: Is


Posted by: Sly (silvas-36176@mypacks.net) on Mon Feb 14 22:36:05 2011


> > If I said it is impossible to match the plane of the
> > ball with the plane of the swing -- would you agree or disagree?
>
> Hi Sly,
>
> I disagree.
>
> Here is a picture of the plane of the bat path on a plane of the ball path:
>
> http://www.batspeed.com/screenshot.html?s=4
>
> The knob of the bat and the bat head define the plane. The ball is traveling on that plane during the
relevant moments. The bat plane is not cutting across the path of the ball during the relevant moments.
>
> When you hear the poor hitting coaches' say, "hit down on the ball", they are telling the kids to cut
across the path of the ball which limits the amount of time the ball and bat have a chance at contact to a
single point.
>
> -------

Joe,

Thanks for replying.

1. The knob of the bat and the bat head define the plane. / Yes, I agree.
(Although, I guess one could argue that it is the motion of the bat (motion of the knob and head) which
creates the plane. A bat leaning against the wall or held stationary in your hands would not create a plane
would it?).

2. The ball is traveling on that plane during the relevant moments. / Yes, I agree.
(If the batter can set the angle of the swing plane appropriately, the ball will travel on the swing plane as
the ball moves through the hitting zone).

3. The bat plane is not cutting across the path of the ball during the relevant moments. / Yes, I agree.
(That would reduce the chance for contact).

4. When you hear the poor hitting coaches' say, "hit down on the ball", they are telling the kids to cut
across the path of the ball which limits the amount of time the ball and bat have a chance at contact to a
single point. / Yes, agreed.
(One of the huge benefits to a properly angled swing plane is that it allows the bat to stay on the flight
path of the ball, which means you can make contact even if your timing is a little off. With "hit down to the
ball" you don't get this benefit -- this type swing has to be timed perfectly to get good contact).

As to my original assertion -- I still believe it to be true. The reason you can't match the plane of the ball
to the plane of the swing is this: You can't match the swing plane to something that doesn't exist. The
ball's movement does not create a plane, but rather a "line" or path.


Do you agree?

The reason I think the plane/line designation is important is this. I had a discussion with a fellow who was
convinced that the linear, down to the ball type swing is what is required for "match the plane of the swing
to the plane of the pitch. He could only think of the pitch plane in one position -- sort of like a roll of gift
wrap or paper towels extending from pitcher to catcher. When he showed me his swing and the position of
his bat at POC, it was like the graphic they sometimes use on that hitting trainer known as the Instructo-
Swing. You know -- where the guy holds the bat level to the ground out in front with extended arms as he
squishes the bug? He said "See, I told you so -- The planes match".

I am a firm believer in the rotational hitting method. I don't want to use any term that someone promoting
the chop, swing down, seatbelt, shoulder strap, pound the ball in the dirt -- could possibly use and cause
confusion.


Followups:

Post a followup:
Name:
E-mail:
Subject:
Text:

Anti-Spambot Question:
Three strikes is an _____________?
   Homerun
   Out
   Stolen base
   Touchdown

   
[   SiteMap   ]