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How to Increase Bat Speed
Linear vs Rotational Drills

Lead Leg Drives Hip Rotation

Drills that Increase Bat Speed

Hitting a Softball with Power

Rotation & Stationary Axis

Powerful Launch Position

Does Bat Speed Equal Power

Rotational Swing Mechanics
Increase Bat Speed

Role of the Back Arm

How to Hit a Homerun in Softball





Rotational Hitting Instruction | Lead Leg Drives Hip Rotation

In our Instructional Video, The Final Arc 2, we instruct hitters to use the extension of their lead-leg to drive hip rotation. This is a very different from the hip rotation instruction given by most linear and rotational hitting coaches. Most batting coaches would contend that the back leg is mostly responsible for rotating the hips.

While we may all agree on the importance of hip rotation, what generates that rotation is where the disagreements occur. Some coaches (whom we disagree with) would make the following argument: As the batter strides, he transferees his weight forward to a firm (posted) front side. As the linear progression of the hips is blocked, its linear momentum is transferred into rotational momentum that causes the back-hip to rotate around the blocked front-hip. Therefore, the axis of hip rotation is around the front-hip, much like a gate swinging on a hinge.

We disagree and would respond as follows: The batter strides to a well flexed lead leg. As the lead heel drops, all forward movement of the body slows to a stop. The extension of the lead leg then drives the lead hip rearward at the same rate as the back hip rotates forward. Therefore, the axis of rotation is around the center of the body, much like a revolving door.

This topic is analyzed further in the video below.

Note: All the videos you see here and on our MrBatSpeed Youtube Channel were produced with Batspeed.com's Motionview "Elite" software, which is a very useful tool for analyzing players' swings.

Jack Mankin

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