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Re: Re: Power Field Orientation


Posted by: Doug () on Tue Mar 30 20:45:19 2004


Hi all,
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> > > > > > > > > > > > I unearthed an integral concept that will allow individuals will poor power to center and to right to increase the amount of home runs that they will produce. At this point in time, this idea is simply in its hypothetical form; therefore, I cannot offer quantitative quotes as to how this method will increase a hitter's productivity. Nevertheless, I can explain the delineation behind the proposition.
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> > > > > > > > > > > > Let's assume that a right-handed batter has the capability to hit a ball 375 feet to left field, 360 to left center, 345 to center, 330 to right center, and 315 to right. Now, let's suppose the home run distance to right is 330; to left center, 365; to center, 400; to right center, 365, and to right, 330. If the player hits 25 fly balls--5 balls as hard as he can to each field--he clears left by 45 feet, but falls 5 feet short on his hits to left center; 55 feet short on his shots to center; 35 feet short on his shots to right center; and, finally, 15 feet shorts on his fly balls to right.
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> > > > > > > > > > > > Now suppose he pulls every ball...Obviously, every hit would wind up a home run, and he would wind up hitting 20 more home runs than he did the previous year. What this hitter discovered is that the placement of fly balls is just as significant as how hard they are hit. By attempting to pull every pitch--a hitting taboo--this individual has given himself an advantage over other hitters. As a member of my family once said, a 375 foot fly ball does no good when directed toward center field.
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> > > > > > > > > > > > For this reason, I disagree with Mankin's belief that balls should be directed towards center field. He should, instand, encourage batters to take advantage of a system that allows them to pull both inside and outside pitches.
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> > > > > > > > > > > > Eventually, once a hitter masters batspeed.com's theories, he should try to pull all his balls.
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> > > > > > > > > > > > Sincerely,
> > > > > > > > > > > > BHL
> > > > > > > > > > > > Knight1285@aol.com
> > > > > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > > > > P.S. Mac's 62nd home run was an outside pitch pulled to left, into his power field (Ted Williams terminology).
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> > > > > > > > > > > I suggest you write poetry.
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> > > > > > > > > > Hi Teacherman,
> > > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > > Your icy demeanor is
> > > > > > > > > > Chilled a few degrees below the icy ground that you
> > > > > > > > > > Stand upon.
> > > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > > Obviously, I am treating your "indifference" with a poem about "indifference." However, I must admit that your remark proved pretty amusing, proving that, contrary to what is said on this site, you do have a sense of humor. Now, let me allow you to understand the logic behind my point.
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> > > > > > > > > > Jack's system allows inside and outside pitches to be pulled. If his biomechanical principles allow one to hit to the pull field, why not take advantage by perfecting a method of timing whereby all well hit fly balls can be hit to the pull field? I am getting mixed reactions to my new philosophy, but I welcome all input, whether they laud or criticize my delineations.
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> > > > > > > > > > Teacherman, I recall in one of your posts that you argue that those with intestinal fortitude do not "run and hide," but remain obstinate when others attempt to erode principles that they disagree with. Yes, I have taken the criticism into account, and understand why some individuals may believe that this principle is ludicrous, or may even lead to bad habits. Yet, my theory is still in its infancy, and must be nourished. This is not to say that baseball wisdom embraces this unconventional idea; rather, I believe it shuns it, and, seeing that I have not validated a real-case scenario for allowing this theory to work other than in home run derby, they have every right to.
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> > > > > > > > > > All I'm saying is that if a system allows a person to pull all pitches, why not use it?
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> > > > > > > > > > Sincerely,
> > > > > > > > > > BHL
> > > > > > > > > > Knight1285@aol.com
> > > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > > P.S. Teacherman, can you point a flaw in my model? If you do, I will address it promptly. Of course, I expect a plethora of disagreement, although I was delighted that one individual find my idea intriguing.
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> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > Assuming BHL is a righthanded hitter......
> > > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > Now I lay me down to sleep. I pray the Lord my soul to keep. And, if I should have one last wish. Please let me throw 90+ over the outside part of the dish. Give me a curve, a slider and a change from hell. And let me play in "the league" against BHL. For as he tries to pull my every throw, I'll be raking in the dough. Give me the combination of Tinker to Owens to Chance. And BHL won't be long for the dance.
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> > > > > > > > > Hi Teacherman,
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > There are three main problems with your poem. First and foremost, it uses too many cliches. Secondly, the versification sounds coerced to fit with a rhyming word at the end of the sentence. Third of all, if my memory serves me correctly, it is "Tinkers to Evers to Chance," rather than "Tinkers to Owens to Chance." Please heed your advice, and "think before your type."
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> > > > > > > > However, you do raise an significant point about throwing me curves, sliders, and changes. All I have to do is wait a little longer on those piches, and pull them! Ironically, you have given me easier pitches to pull than a fstball. When my latest appears at the bottom of the thread, please read it. I believe it will give you more insight into my philosophy, and provide you with the name of sources that I accredit.
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> > > > > > > > I just want you to know, though, that I will do my best to be friendly towards you, but at the same time, be a fair critic. The job is tough. Nonetheless, doing so can teach us all a valuable lesson about responsibility, as Mr. Rogers used to say, towards your "neighbors," and performing your job justly.
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> > > > > > > > Cheers!
> > > > > > > > BHL
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Owens was the second baseman on my college team. The best I ever saw at turning the dp, including any mlb player your choose.
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> > > > > > Hi Teacherman,
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Obviously my strategy is in no way "rigid." If a ballpark's fences were 300 feet in all directions--including the alley--then going to all fields will make sense. However, the majority of the parks reward well-hit pulled balls. For this reason, I advocate my method.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Should the situation be reversed (i.e., hitters are rewarded by going the opposite way), they should focus on trying to hit the pitch the opposite way. If the curve is "inverted" so that center field is the shortest, individuals should try to go "straight away."
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Due to the current situation of ball park dimensions, my argument makes sense. I am not saying that individuals should not "guess" their pitch; instead, I am devising a way that they can pull their pitch into the bleachers once they get it. Even with two strikes, a fast bat like Gary Sheffield can still hit pitches into the stand, even if it is not his pitch.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Sincerely,
> > > > > > BHL
> > > > > > Knight1285@aol.com
> > > > > >
> > > > > > P.S. I have one question for Teacherman--how do you get ahold of Max Ratafor by e-mail (i.e., my e-mails keep telling me that it is the wrong address)?
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> > > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Without meaning to be too blunt, at what level have you played?
> > > >
> > > > Hi Teacherman,
> > > >
> > > > I led the league in home runs in a few independent slow pitch softball games using my philosophy. One day, some unwise individual says that I could never hit a 95+ mph fastball. Well, you guessed it? I pulled it over the fence!
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> > > > I believe that I could have played at a higher level, but I was constantly being bombarded with theories about hitting the other way.
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> > > > I guess I could not take the politics!
> > > >
> > > > Sincerely,
> > > > BHL
> > > > Knight1285@aol.com
> > > >
> > > > 1/X=Teacherman, what league have you played in?
> > >
> > > I played DII baseball in the mid 70's. I played fastpitch softball on a top ten team in the nation into my 40's. I coached high school ball. I coached summer select ball. I played with players who played in the big leagues. I got to hang around them when they came to town. I've talked hitting with them. I've frequented the top 2-3 internet sites for several years. Never has anyone condoned pulling the outside pitch.
> > >
> > > I was also a catcher. I've handled pitching staffs. I had a unique view of the hitting process. I taught pitchers the benefit of working in then out and saw hitter after hitter try to pull the outside pitch. Routine grounb balls are the result. It is very obvious that trying to pull outside pitches is a major flaw in hitters. Gound balls to the ss and 2b are prevalent with these hitters.
> > >
> > > Your slow pitch softball experience just doesn't help you. Yes, with the time you have in that game, you may be able to pull every pitch successfully. But when you have .4 of a second to see the ball, recognize the type of pitch, predicts it's location, predict its speed and get the bat on it you won't be successful with a pull everything swing.
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> > > Deciding your swing mechanics based on the length of the fence is like saying I'll shoot a basketball from 1/2 court because its worth 3 points and they won't guard me from there. In both cases your opposition is happy
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> >
> > Good post Teacherman. If a guy never gives in and tries to pull everything, all you have to do is throw sinkers away and he will beat balls into the ground. Williams and Bonds are (were) both pull hitters, but they are also smart and when they faced good pitchers who did not give in, they smoked balls the other way. Stubborn hitters are the same as stubborn pitchers.......they do not reach their potential.
> >
> > Doug
>
>
> DOug or Teacherman......When you say pulling the pitch.....what is pulling to make that happen? Do you even know? Maybe your idea of pulling is what someone else would call, "Turning on a pitch". I'm certain you with all of that high level experience you could describe for us the part of the anatomy that is pulling, when you say "pulling on the pitch". Sounds like neither one of you reached your potential.......as instructors.
>
> FP

FP, I don't know where you are going with your post, but pulling is a rt hand hitter tring to hit all pitches to the left of 2nd base. To the rt of 2nd base for a lefty. If you try to do it on every pitch, you will be a lot easier to pitch to. As far as teaching goes, I always ask this question.....who have you taught and where are they at? I very seldom get an answer to the question.

Doug


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