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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Elbow position


Posted by: Scott (stwinton@netzero.net) on Sun May 1 23:30:37 2005


> >>> Hitting through the top of the ball, on fastballs, at about a 45 degree angle creates backspin, which makes the ball travel farther, when hit correctly deep in the zone. You can see where Puljos wants/expects the ball to be when he moves his hands up and down during his pre-pitch preparation. He wants/expects a fastball down the middle that he can catch deep and drop the head of the bat on, then, after contact, driving it out of the park somewhere. Also, any ground ball is always better than a fly ball, thus getting on top of the ball is generally what you want to do 90-95% of the time in most situations. You have to field, throw, and catch on a ground ball. A fly ball just needs to be caught.
> > why would you want to hit the top of the ball? <<<
>
> Hi Eric
>
> I doubt that even Scott would agree with your statement. Regardless of the backspin induced, it is physically impossible for a ball hit above the centerline to attain the lift angle to even come near the fence much less clear it. That is true for a bat angling downward or on an up-slope at contact. Does anyone have an address for a Puljos clip?
>
> Jack Mankin

MLB averages on balls put in play...got this from a hittig lecture at the ABCA 1999...

All Fly Balls = .176
All Ground Ball = .376
All Line Drives = .760

Hit all ground balls and line drives and you will go to the Hall of fame! You don't get bad hops in the air!


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