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Re: Re: Re: Why rotational hitter strike out alot


Posted by: coach 13 (halour@netscape.net) on Thu Jan 4 14:46:50 2007


> > > Jimmy. Rotational hitters strike out and fly out a lot for a number of reasons.
> > >
> > > 1. (fault) swinging to hard in an effort to generate homeruns- when the batter swings to
> > hard, he has a tendency to pull off the pitch. This means he is not seeing the ball the full
> > 60 ft. This leads to an uppercut rather than the desired upswing.
> > >
> > > 2. (fault) uppercutting the high pitch. For the most part the hitter must make an early
> > decision to swing at a high pitch. This means the contact angle has to be precise if the
> > hitter is to hit the high pitch. This is because the high pitch has less downward movement
> > than a pitch belt high or knee high. Thus the normal upswing may be inefficient to hit a
> > pitch that is chest high or shoulder high. And even though the chest high and above
> > pitches are usually not modern day strikes, batters still attempt to swing at them becausue
> > they are closer to eye level and appear hittable. Often a player who starts with his hands
> > high has a better chance hitting a high pitch as his swing plane is more close to the direct
> > line of the incoming pitch. In addition, when a hitter strides to hit a pitch his head lowers
> > slightly as his stride takes place. This makes it harder to swing up once the swing is
> > initiated. This means that a linear hitter will have trouble as well on the high pitch.
> > >
> > > 3. (fault) lack of situational hitting- back in the day hitters took striking out as an
> > embarassment. Lou Brock once sat out the final game of the season in an effort not to
> > strike out 100 times. Today when a hitter has 2 strikes he still swings for the fences, does
> > not choke up and still tries to pull the ball (for the most part) rather than focus on putting
> > the ball in play. Times change, techniques change, and now management is willing to
> > overlook strike outs if the hitter drives in runs. In addition, players are being paid more if
> > the hit homeruns and drive in runs (especially in the clutch). Barry Bonds is basically the
> > only power hitter who chokes up. Ted Williams used to choke up and or level out his
> > upswing if he was not making contact in his usual fashion.
> > >
> > > It should be noted that linear hitters strike out a lot as well. The difference is that since
> > they take less risk for the most part by simply putting the ball in play, their chances for
> > contact are increased. And some rotational hitters wait longer for a particular pitch, which
> > would leave them less opportunities for putting the ball in play.
> > >
> > > One of the best players in the game today is Grady Sizemore. He has great speed but
> > strikes out alot. He also has good power and will likely become a number 3 hitter some
> > day. Another player with speed to watch is Curtis Granderson. He too has great speed and
> > has some power. But as a lead off man he strikes out too much and was among the league
> > leaders in that department. But rather rotational or other technique, many strikeouts and
> > flyouts can be avoided by learning the strikezone and what pitches one can handle best.
> > That in itself will allow the hitter to have more productive at bats.
> >
> > Hi Guru,
> >
> > I agree with you on the point about hitters avoiding numerous strikeouts and flyouts by
> > learning the strikezone and what pitches one can handle best. But I also think that hitters
> > do know what pitches they can handle best, the ones in the middle part of the plate and
> > about thigh high. That is why they are hit the hardest and the most consistant.
> >
> > The problem is the lack of control in thier physical approach as well as the lack of a plan at
> > the plate. The hitter needs a physical approach that will allow him to be aggressive but yet
> > under control at the same time so that he can execute a solid simple plan at the plate and
> > ultimately be productive for his team.
> >
> > As far as strikeouts. Exclusively rotational hitters have less control of thier swing limiting
> > the ability to take pitches out of thier zone. They also have a smaller area in the strike
> > zone that they can handle than that of hitters that use a combination of rotation and linear
> > mechanics. The combination of these two things leads to a poor "two-strike" approach.
> > This kills them because if they are too selective and get to two strikes, they get beat, and
> > they can't offer at pitches early in the count because they won't be able to drive them or
> > even touch them. (unless they get lucky and all the planets line up and they get the only
> > pitch at the only speed that they can handle).
> >
> > So the cycle begins for the rotational hitter starting with the "wait and see if I should start
> > my swing" type of approach, where they get rushed and are late with the barrel and get
> > beat many times. Then they get into the "try to guess what pitch is comming" approach,
> > where they look absolutely rediculous swinging at fifty foot breakingballs in the dirt.
> >
> > As far as the fly balls that rotational hitters hit, I think it has alot to do with the fact that
> > thier barrel travels more and more toward the ground early in the swing with every inch
> > that the front shoulder flies open. This allows gravity to work on it way to soon and helps
> > to cause that path of the bat to come up and under many pitches. This also means that
> > his bat is working against gravity most of the swing and actually slows his "bat-speed"
> > down.
> >
> > The hitters that use rotational and linear characteristics in the swing can have a plan at the
> > plate and execute it. That is being aggressive to an area of the zone and have enough
> > control to shut the swing off on pitches out of that zone. These are the hitters that will
> > produce the most runs for any team.
> >
> > Jimmy
>
> Hey Jimmy
>
> "As far as the fly balls that rotational hitters hit, I think it has alot to do with the fact that
> thier barrel travels more and more toward the ground early in the swing with every inch
> that the front shoulder flies open. This allows gravity to work on it way to soon and helps
> to cause that path of the bat to come up and under many pitches. This also means that
> his bat is working against gravity most of the swing and actually slows his "bat-speed"
> down."
>
> This statement has many faults in it and when you apply biomechanics and physics to the statement it makes even less sense. The first thing you are describing a hitter who casts there hands out away from thier body prior to passing their center of gravity or a person who is 'spinning out' thier lower and upper body. That is poor rotational hitting just like there is poor linear hitting. Rotational motion (centrifical force) actually works against gravity and would assist keeping the bat aloft. Stand and spin in one spot with an object in your hands that is touching the groud at the start it is never on the ground after you finish spinning fast unless it weighs more then the centrifical force can lift.
>
> I have read most of your posts and I understand what you are describing and do agree with many points but remember that you can have a terrible swing but if you can execute a plan and swing at only pitches that you can hit and leave the others the terrible swing will be successful too. They have greater limitations on their success but are still successful. Please describe the correct techniques before lumping everyone into a category.
>
> DAve P

Hi Dave I agree with you these blanket statements and cliches that the linear believers hang their hats on are weak and often self serving. I recently had the Head Coach of a college in Lousiana host a hitting camp in her home town in Nebraska. (she was home for the holidays) When she played college ball she changed from the linear disconnected concept to the rotational connected swing and became one of the best hitters in college. Her batting average was .402 and her slugging percentage was .779. She said she would never have set these standards using a linear swing. I believe that the number one reason that pitching dominates in womens softball is because of the linear swing concept. It is human nature to resist change, but with the advent. of digital photogrophy some people look only for what they believe, and ignore reality. I also agree some players have less than perfect swings but can become successful, usually because their athletecisim overides the flaws. Not every one has that luxury and must depend on the basic fundimentals, biomechanics and physics to get the desired result. I might also note that this tremendously successful player and now a head coach made a statement that "as soon as you start using your arms this disconnects your arms from your body." In other words the hips start the swing. Thanks for letting me add my two cents.
coach13


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This is known as hitting for the cycle in a game?
   Single, double, triple, homerun
   Four singles
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   Three stikeouts

   
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