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Re: Re: Re: Fear of getting hit by a pitch


Posted by: Kevin () on Tue May 3 17:04:00 2011


> mY SON HAS ALWAYS BEEN GOOD IN BASEBALL- NOW HE IS 10 AND I N LITTLE LEAGUE-- BALL MUCH FASTER-- LOSING INTEREST BECAUSE HE'S AFRAID OF THE BALL.. i WILL SUGGEST SOME ARMOUR GEAR TO PROTECT CHEST-- i HATE TO SEE HIM QUIT BECAUSE OF THIS-- ANY OTHER SUGGESTIONS?

What is often suggested by coaches in tutorials is a drill where he is in the batter's box and someone pitches tennis balls at him. When the ball comes toward the batter, the batter is supposed to turn his back and let the ball strike him in the back. Doing this means there will only be a slight bruise as opposed to a broken bone if he is struck in the hand, wrist or face.

However, I had the same experience in Little League (compounded by a father who liked to yell instructions from behind the plate at games). My fear at the time was such that I was none too thrilled about the idea of being struck by a pitch anywhere or even practicing being hit as I described in the previous paragraph.

What I wish I would have been encouraged to do at that age in a very positive and persistent manner was to learn how to switch hit. Much of your son's problem likely comes from facing same-side pitchers. That means if your son bats right handed, most of the pitchers he faces also throw right handed. From where he stands in the batters box, the angle of the pitcher's arm appears to release the ball directly at him. If someone is willing to work with him on developing the proper mechanics to hit from both sides of the plate, much of his fear will probably be gone and he will find it easier to be able to concentrate on just hitting the ball again.

Hope this helps.


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